The Sámi's old traditions and culture are still alive to this day. The traditional livelihoods such as reindeer husbandry, fishing, hunting and handicrafts are part of everyday life in Sámi communities, even though the high-tech world has lured many youngsters away. Tourists in Lapland need to be perceptive to see the area's true culture in the midst of all the entertainment provided through tourism.

Numerous sites related to Sámi culture have survived in Lapland's national parks and wilderness areas. These places are being protected and restored so that future generations can use them and see them. Hikers are welcome to come see these sites, which are an important part of the area's history.

A majority of the place names in Northern Lapland are originally Sámi. They describe the said place according to its natural features or any peculiarities there. Place names have functioned as maps and as orienteering tools. The Finnish versions of the names are the original name in a form which is easier for Finns to pronounce.

You can also find out about Sámi culture at Siida, which houses the Sámi Museum and The Northern Lapland Nature Centre.