Siilaskoski Rapids

On the trail leading to Malla Strict Nature Reserve, there is a bridge over the River Siilasjoki that empties into Lake Kilpisjärvi. Lake Siilasjärvi is located in a watershed 484 metres above sea level. Siilasjärvi belongs to the Könkämäeno catchment area, which means the waters empty through the River Könkämäeno into the River Tornion-Muonionjoki and the Gulf of Bothnia. North of Jehkatstunturi Fell, all waters flow into the Arctic Ocean.

Bridge over Siilasjoki River. Photo: Ismo Pekkarinen

Pikku-Malla Fell

The peak of Pikku-Malla is 738 metres above sea level, 265 metres above the surface of Lake Kilpisjärvi. There is a hiking trail up to the top, and from there you may admire the view towards Saana Fell, Lake Kilpisjärvi and the fells beyond the Swedish border.

Kitsiputous Falls

The Kitsiputous Falls are located along the hiking trail leading to the Three Nations' Border Point. The falls start from the side of Iso-Malla Fell. In the winter, the waterfalls turn into awesome frozen waterfalls.

The Three Nations' Border Point

The point where the borders of Finland, Sweden and Norway meet is located about 11 km west of the village of Kilpisjärvi. The place can be reached by taking the hiking trail going through Malla Strict Nature Reserve, or by hopping onboard the M/S Malla operating between the village of Kilpisjärvi and Koltalahti. From Koltalahti, it is a little less than a three-kilometre walk to the boundary mark. Just a few hundred metres from the mark, there is the Kuohkimajärvi open and reservable wilderness hut.

The Three Nations' Border Point. Photo: Seija Olkkonen

The boundary mark was erected by Russia and Norway in 1897, because Sweden did not approve the frontier treaty with Norway at the time. It was not until 1901 that Sweden approved the boundary mark. Today, the boundary mark is the northernmost point in the Kingdom of Sweden and the westernmost point in Finland outside the Åland Islands.

Lake Goldajärvi

Situated at the three nations' border, Lake Goldajärvi is a rare bifurcation lake, which means its waters empty into two different directions. From Goldajärvi, the waters flow to both Lake Kilpisjärvi and the Lyngen Fjord by the Arctic Ocean in Norway.