Hunting Lands of the Forest Sámi

Forest Sámi who lived in the Pyhä-Luosto area in olden days considered Pyhätunturi Fell sacred. They went to the seita at Uhriharju to ask the gods for good fortune during their hunt. Body parts of game such as wild forest reindeer and reindeer were sacrificed. Pagan sacrificial rituals ended at the end of the 17th century, because the Sámi were baptised into the Christian faith between 1620 and 1680. The places where christenings took place are now called Lake Pyhänkasteenlampi and Pyhänkasteenputous Falls (‘pyhä kaste'= holy baptism).

Pyhätunturi Fell was first an important wild forest reindeer hunting ground and then a reindeer husbandry area from the time that reindeer husbandry begun.

Pyhänkasteenputous. Photo: Tapani Vartiainen


Logging

Pyhätunturi was a logging area at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th century. Logging took place during winter and the tallest trees were chosen for this purpose. Signs of these early loggings are still visible in the terrain; tall tree stumps and winter roads, which logs were transported along. Forestry was practised in the area until Pyhätunturi National Park was established in 1938.

The Luosto fell chain is bordered in the north by the River Kitinen. There were large logging operations in the area especially in the 1920s and 1930s. Felled trees were transported to the banks of the River Kitinen to await summer, when they were floated down the river. The foundations of many loggers' cabins are still visible.

There were two estates in the area at the beginning of the 20th century. They were given land and small patches of forest in the fell chain area. There has not been any other population in the fells. Forest rangers noted the Luosto area's exceptional beauty already in the 1950s and the area was outlined for recreational use.

The Beginnings of Tourism

The Luosto area has been a tourist destination from the end of the 1960s. Pyhätunturi on the other hand has been a destination from as far back as the 1920s. The first time a proposal for a national park in the Luosto-Pyhätunturi area was made was in 1910. The plan was carried out only in the Pyhätunturi area in 1938. The entire Pyhä-Luosto area was named a national park in 2005, nearly 100 years after the process began.

Pyhä-Luosto views Photo: Kimmo Kuure

Pyhä-Luosto National Park

  • Established 2005
  • Area 142 km²

The Emblem of Pyhä-Luosto National Park - Siberian Jay and a dead standing tree

The Emblem of Pyhä-Luosto National Park is Siberian Jay and a dead standing tree