Heretty Loggers' Cabin

Heretty Cabin was built in the winter 1946 - 47 to accommodate the loggers who worked in the area. It was meant for 26 men but, during the busiest times in the end of 1940 and in the 1950s, there lived about 40 men and a housekeeper with her helper. Mostly horsemen lived in Heretty Cabin.

Heretty Cabin. Photo: Riitta Häkkinen

Nowadays all the buildings of Heretty Cabin are intact. In addition to the cabin, there are horse stables, a building for drying cones, a sauna and a shed. Heretty Cabin was restored to its original state, and it is now a museum. There is a cafe during the summer.

Huhtala Croft

Huhtala Croft is located in the northwest corner of the National Park, and it is protected because of being a nationally valuable example of the old way of living. In addition to the main building, the remaining buildings include three storage buildings, a sauna, smaller dwelling house for the old generation of the farm and for guests to stay in, and a shed for storing straw cut into chaff for the use of cattle.

Wuori-Huhta farm is mentioned in history books to have existed already in the 1700s. The present main building was built in 1850s, and the storage buildings are from the end of 1700s. The grounds of the croft are managed traditionally by scything. Some old garden plant species can still be found on the grounds, such as the Burnet Rose (Rosa Pimpinellifolia) and the Michaelmas Daisy (Aster novi-belgii).

Huhtala croft. Photo: Maarit Kyöstilä
Luutsaari Fishing Cottage

In 1833, a fishing cottage was built in the southern end of Luutsaari Island on Lake Isojärvi, by eight houses which practiced seine fishing together. Before the lake froze over in the autumn, a man from each house came to the cottage for several weeks to fish, and to salt the fish for the winter. Nowadays the fishing cottage is inside the National Park, but the building is maintained by supporters´ association named  Luutsaaren Kalapirtin Kannatusyhdistys ry (www.kalapirtti.fi).

Heretty Nature Trail Brochure

Pdf-file 6.3 Mb (julkaisut.metsa.fi)